73 and Web3

My project is a blog aimed at the non-developer community to promote the decentralized web and it's development.

Demo Video Live Demo Source Code

Description

This is a blog about development of Web3.. My files in Github give an expanded view of the work. My work looks into use of computers into the internet, web 1.0, web 2.0 and the formation and development of Web3. My goal was to encourage the use of the Web3 as it becomes more available to all of us. I also hope to encourage the developers to unveil the Web3 to the general public.

How It's Made

73 and Web3 What is HackFS I am 73 years old with no previous Web3 experience and after spending four weeks participating at the ETHGlobal HackFS event, what I came away with is truly remarkable. The organizer gathers sponsors and experienced developers to teach about Web3 and share their knowledge and instruction about the knowledge, apps, and tools they have that will lead to the development of new apps for Web3. There are hundreds of participants organized into teams working together to build an app to present at the end of the hackathon for judging. This allows for an open exchange of ideas for both new and old developers. The positivity, flow of information, and excitement was evident even in a virtual setting. Everyone was encouraged to try new skills no matter their knowledge level. Without any previous understanding, I felt the urge to try it myself. There were times I thought I was in a cooking class. I started hearing some of the terminology like stacking and layers, but my biggest surprise was when I heard someone speaking about a Raspberry Pie. Raspberry Pie! The person spoke about adding information to his Raspberry Pi, and all I could do was picture an actual Raspberry Pie. I discovered that a Raspberry Pi is a small toy-looking device that can be programmed. My grandchildren have one of them and they're going to learn how to code with it. Now I know. At a later session, it turned out that there was an effort being made to build into this Raspberry Pi a way to communicate privately with another Raspberry Pi using one of the new protocols we had been learning about. This is partly what a hackathon is all about. Through these presentations, I began to learn some of the primary attributes of Web3. Learning Web3 During this project I was delving into the basics of Web3 at home. I found that in everyday life, we can see the influence the web has made, both good and bad. The development and subsequent use of Web3 offers a much safer, enjoyable option. The apps developed have one, and in some cases two, levels of encryption to safeguard important and personal data. In every case, you and only you own your information. In Web3, when you send an email, submit an order to a store, or even deposit money at your bank, you can do it without a server, and no middle-man. - That means less bandwidth. That is a good thing. - Requests are encrypted. That is a good thing. - Your orders or transactions can be recorded and verifiable. That is a good thing. There are many cases that benefit and could be safe, more secure, and verifiable using Web3. Web3 is building and building in a big way. There is a place for ideas to flourish. There are very few opportunities for new ideas on the current web because of the control of just a few entities. Web3 has no one controller. It is open for anyone to try. Success or failure is there for all to try. All equal. Exploring a use-case that affects us all One of the first areas affected by the pandemic is the doctors and the hospitals. We saw in the recent news that some doctors were taking to the web and visit with their patients online. I know some patients were reluctant and wondered if that was suitable. Not only physically, but there was concern about personal information. With laws today, privacy is a big issue. I see that as the perfect area for development of apps for doctors that would be both safe and effective. Based on what I learned this month, IPFS would be a suitable technology to build solutions for patients and doctors' needs. Do you have all your medical history? If you've moved a few times, you probably have as many different histories. With technology today, it should be no problem to keep all your medical history right in your pocket either on your phone, your computer, or in a file safely stored away. This history can include all tests, X-rays, and anything else that you have ever received from a physician. I think this is a real plus for us as we get older and can't remember everything anymore! Leveraging IPFS technology to store medical history could reduce repeat tests given due to missing records and provides a safe, encrypted way to share information directly with your doctor. One report in Discovery indicated that the use of AI is making headway for doctors to start eliminating valuable time spent in record keeping and, in doing so, giving time back to their patients. I see a lot of this potentially working well in Web3 because of decentralized, verifiable, and secure protocols that would benefit both the doctors and us. People can feel secure that their information can't be compromised. The future of Web3 I think this pandemic is only going to accelerate the use of Web3. Having the time at home and participating in this hackathon has piqued my own curiosity. I wonder what it would be like to build an app. I’m very interested in genealogy. What if I could store information about my family that would be accessible to my family? I could then move family trees from paid sites, such as Ancestry and MyHeritage. If I decided not to pay them anymore, my work is no longer accessible to me. I am also blind and struggle to read fine, small print. What about an app with visually-impaired functionality that could store my family’s genealogy securely for generations to come? I would like to store my family pictures and videos and maybe even an audio history. What I like about using Web3 technology with IPFS is that everything would be hashed and verifiable for future families. As I said right in the beginning, I am 73 years old. I have had a very busy life. By my genetic background, I can be around for another 15-20 years and want to be active, keep my brain active, and feel purpose. I would hope that some older and younger people might have some of the same feelings for themselves. It never hurts to learn new things... at any age! I have downloaded a VS Code program and some coding instructions to learn how to build. I have access to ThreadsDB, Buckets, Hub, and Powergate. Now, I'm off to go see my granddaughters and together we can try learning a little coding with the Raspberry Pi! Maybe I’ll see you at the next hackathon. In the meantime, I hope that you get inspired to learn about and hack on Web3, too. 73 and Web3 What is HackFS I am 73 years old with no previous Web3 experience and after spending four weeks participating at the ETHGlobal HackFS event, what I came away with is truly remarkable. The organizer gathers sponsors and experienced developers to teach about Web3 and share their knowledge and instruction about the knowledge, apps, and tools they have that will lead to the development of new apps for Web3. There are hundreds of participants organized into teams working together to build an app to present at the end of the hackathon for judging. This allows for an open exchange of ideas for both new and old developers. The positivity, flow of information, and excitement was evident even in a virtual setting. Everyone was encouraged to try new skills no matter their knowledge level. Without any previous understanding, I felt the urge to try it myself. There were times I thought I was in a cooking class. I started hearing some of the terminology like stacking and layers, but my biggest surprise was when I heard someone speaking about a Raspberry Pie. Raspberry Pie! The person spoke about adding information to his Raspberry Pi, and all I could do was picture an actual Raspberry Pie. I discovered that a Raspberry Pi is a small toy-looking device that can be programmed. My grandchildren have one of them and they're going to learn how to code with it. Now I know. At a later session, it turned out that there was an effort being made to build into this Raspberry Pi a way to communicate privately with another Raspberry Pi using one of the new protocols we had been learning about. This is partly what a hackathon is all about. Through these presentations, I began to learn some of the primary attributes of Web3. Learning Web3 During this project I was delving into the basics of Web3 at home. I found that in everyday life, we can see the influence the web has made, both good and bad. The development and subsequent use of Web3 offers a much safer, enjoyable option. The apps developed have one, and in some cases two, levels of encryption to safeguard important and personal data. In every case, you and only you own your information. In Web3, when you send an email, submit an order to a store, or even deposit money at your bank, you can do it without a server, and no middle-man. - That means less bandwidth. That is a good thing. - Requests are encrypted. That is a good thing. - Your orders or transactions can be recorded and verifiable. That is a good thing. There are many cases that benefit and could be safe, more secure, and verifiable using Web3. Web3 is building and building in a big way. There is a place for ideas to flourish. There are very few opportunities for new ideas on the current web because of the control of just a few entities. Web3 has no one controller. It is open for anyone to try. Success or failure is there for all to try. All equal. Exploring a use-case that affects us all One of the first areas affected by the pandemic is the doctors and the hospitals. We saw in the recent news that some doctors were taking to the web and visit with their patients online. I know some patients were reluctant and wondered if that was suitable. Not only physically, but there was concern about personal information. With laws today, privacy is a big issue. I see that as the perfect area for development of apps for doctors that would be both safe and effective. Based on what I learned this month, IPFS would be a suitable technology to build solutions for patients and doctors' needs. Do you have all your medical history? If you've moved a few times, you probably have as many different histories. With technology today, it should be no problem to keep all your medical history right in your pocket either on your phone, your computer, or in a file safely stored away. This history can include all tests, X-rays, and anything else that you have ever received from a physician. I think this is a real plus for us as we get older and can't remember everything anymore! Leveraging IPFS technology to store medical history could reduce repeat tests given due to missing records and provides a safe, encrypted way to share information directly with your doctor. One report in Discovery indicated that the use of AI is making headway for doctors to start eliminating valuable time spent in record keeping and, in doing so, giving time back to their patients. I see a lot of this potentially working well in Web3 because of decentralized, verifiable, and secure protocols that would benefit both the doctors and us. People can feel secure that their information can't be compromised. The future of Web3 I think this pandemic is only going to accelerate the use of Web3. Having the time at home and participating in this hackathon has piqued my own curiosity. I wonder what it would be like to build an app. I’m very interested in genealogy. What if I could store information about my family that would be accessible to my family? I could then move family trees from paid sites, such as Ancestry and MyHeritage. If I decided not to pay them anymore, my work is no longer accessible to me. I am also blind and struggle to read fine, small print. What about an app with visually-impaired functionality that could store my family’s genealogy securely for generations to come? I would like to store my family pictures and videos and maybe even an audio history. What I like about using Web3 technology with IPFS is that everything would be hashed and verifiable for future families. As I said right in the beginning, I am 73 years old. I have had a very busy life. By my genetic background, I can be around for another 15-20 years and want to be active, keep my brain active, and feel purpose. I would hope that some older and younger people might have some of the same feelings for themselves. It never hurts to learn new things... at any age! I have downloaded a VS Code program and some coding instructions to learn how to build. I have access to ThreadsDB, Buckets, Hub, and Powergate. Now, I'm off to go see my granddaughters and together we can try learning a little coding with the Raspberry Pi! Maybe I’ll see you at the next hackathon. In the meantime, I hope that you get inspired to learn about and hack on Web3, too. 73 and Web3 What is HackFS I am 73 years old with no previous Web3 experience and after spending four weeks participating at the ETHGlobal HackFS event, what I came away with is truly remarkable. The organizer gathers sponsors and experienced developers to teach about Web3 and share their knowledge and instruction about the knowledge, apps, and tools they have that will lead to the development of new apps for Web3. There are hundreds of participants organized into teams working together to build an app to present at the end of the hackathon for judging. This allows for an open exchange of ideas for both new and old developers. The positivity, flow of information, and excitement was evident even in a virtual setting. Everyone was encouraged to try new skills no matter their knowledge level. Without any previous understanding, I felt the urge to try it myself. There were times I thought I was in a cooking class. I started hearing some of the terminology like stacking and layers, but my biggest surprise was when I heard someone speaking about a Raspberry Pie. Raspberry Pie! The person spoke about adding information to his Raspberry Pi, and all I could do was picture an actual Raspberry Pie. I discovered that a Raspberry Pi is a small toy-looking device that can be programmed. My grandchildren have one of them and they're going to learn how to code with it. Now I know. At a later session, it turned out that there was an effort being made to build into this Raspberry Pi a way to communicate privately with another Raspberry Pi using one of the new protocols we had been learning about. This is partly what a hackathon is all about. Through these presentations, I began to learn some of the primary attributes of Web3. Learning Web3 During this project I was delving into the basics of Web3 at home. I found that in everyday life, we can see the influence the web has made, both good and bad. The development and subsequent use of Web3 offers a much safer, enjoyable option. The apps developed have one, and in some cases two, levels of encryption to safeguard important and personal data. In every case, you and only you own your information. In Web3, when you send an email, submit an order to a store, or even deposit money at your bank, you can do it without a server, and no middle-man. - That means less bandwidth. That is a good thing. - Requests are encrypted. That is a good thing. - Your orders or transactions can be recorded and verifiable. That is a good thing. There are many cases that benefit and could be safe, more secure, and verifiable using Web3. Web3 is building and building in a big way. There is a place for ideas to flourish. There are very few opportunities for new ideas on the current web because of the control of just a few entities. Web3 has no one controller. It is open for anyone to try. Success or failure is there for all to try. All equal. Exploring a use-case that affects us all One of the first areas affected by the pandemic is the doctors and the hospitals. We saw in the recent news that some doctors were taking to the web and visit with their patients online. I know some patients were reluctant and wondered if that was suitable. Not only physically, but there was concern about personal information. With laws today, privacy is a big issue. I see that as the perfect area for development of apps for doctors that would be both safe and effective. Based on what I learned this month, IPFS would be a suitable technology to build solutions for patients and doctors' needs. Do you have all your medical history? If you've moved a few times, you probably have as many different histories. With technology today, it should be no problem to keep all your medical history right in your pocket either on your phone, your computer, or in a file safely stored away. This history can include all tests, X-rays, and anything else that you have ever received from a physician. I think this is a real plus for us as we get older and can't remember everything anymore! Leveraging IPFS technology to store medical history could reduce repeat tests given due to missing records and provides a safe, encrypted way to share information directly with your doctor. One report in Discovery indicated that the use of AI is making headway for doctors to start eliminating valuable time spent in record keeping and, in doing so, giving time back to their patients. I see a lot of this potentially working well in Web3 because of decentralized, verifiable, and secure protocols that would benefit both the doctors and us. People can feel secure that their information can't be compromised. The future of Web3 I think this pandemic is only going to accelerate the use of Web3. Having the time at home and participating in this hackathon has piqued my own curiosity. I wonder what it would be like to build an app. I’m very interested in genealogy. What if I could store information about my family that would be accessible to my family? I could then move family trees from paid sites, such as Ancestry and MyHeritage. If I decided not to pay them anymore, my work is no longer accessible to me. I am also blind and struggle to read fine, small print. What about an app with visually-impaired functionality that could store my family’s genealogy securely for generations to come? I would like to store my family pictures and videos and maybe even an audio history. What I like about using Web3 technology with IPFS is that everything would be hashed and verifiable for future families. As I said right in the beginning, I am 73 years old. I have had a very busy life. By my genetic background, I can be around for another 15-20 years and want to be active, keep my brain active, and feel purpose. I would hope that some older and younger people might have some of the same feelings for themselves. It never hurts to learn new things... at any age! I have downloaded a VS Code program and some coding instructions to learn how to build. I have access to ThreadsDB, Buckets, Hub, and Powergate. Now, I'm off to go see my granddaughters and together we can try learning a little coding with the Raspberry Pi! Maybe I’ll see you at the next hackathon. In the meantime, I hope that you get inspired to learn about and hack on Web3, too. 73 and Web3 What is HackFS I am 73 years old with no previous Web3 experience and after spending four weeks participating at the ETHGlobal HackFS event, what I came away with is truly remarkable. The organizer gathers sponsors and experienced developers to teach about Web3 and share their knowledge and instruction about the knowledge, apps, and tools they have that will lead to the development of new apps for Web3. There are hundreds of participants organized into teams working together to build an app to present at the end of the hackathon for judging. This allows for an open exchange of ideas for both new and old developers. The positivity, flow of information, and excitement was evident even in a virtual setting. Everyone was encouraged to try new skills no matter their knowledge level. Without any previous understanding, I felt the urge to try it myself. There were times I thought I was in a cooking class. I started hearing some of the terminology like stacking and layers, but my biggest surprise was when I heard someone speaking about a Raspberry Pie. Raspberry Pie! The person spoke about adding information to his Raspberry Pi, and all I could do was picture an actual Raspberry Pie. I discovered that a Raspberry Pi is a small toy-looking device that can be programmed. My grandchildren have one of them and they're going to learn how to code with it. Now I know. At a later session, it turned out that there was an effort being made to build into this Raspberry Pi a way to communicate privately with another Raspberry Pi using one of the new protocols we had been learning about. This is partly what a hackathon is all about. Through these presentations, I began to learn some of the primary attributes of Web3. Learning Web3 During this project I was delving into the basics of Web3 at home. I found that in everyday life, we can see the influence the web has made, both good and bad. The development and subsequent use of Web3 offers a much safer, enjoyable option. The apps developed have one, and in some cases two, levels of encryption to safeguard important and personal data. In every case, you and only you own your information. In Web3, when you send an email, submit an order to a store, or even deposit money at your bank, you can do it without a server, and no middle-man. - That means less bandwidth. That is a good thing. - Requests are encrypted. That is a good thing. - Your orders or transactions can be recorded and verifiable. That is a good thing. There are many cases that benefit and could be safe, more secure, and verifiable using Web3. Web3 is building and building in a big way. There is a place for ideas to flourish. There are very few opportunities for new ideas on the current web because of the control of just a few entities. Web3 has no one controller. It is open for anyone to try. Success or failure is there for all to try. All equal. Exploring a use-case that affects us all One of the first areas affected by the pandemic is the doctors and the hospitals. We saw in the recent news that some doctors were taking to the web and visit with their patients online. I know some patients were reluctant and wondered if that was suitable. Not only physically, but there was concern about personal information. With laws today, privacy is a big issue. I see that as the perfect area for development of apps for doctors that would be both safe and effective. Based on what I learned this month, IPFS would be a suitable technology to build solutions for patients and doctors' needs. Do you have all your medical history? If you've moved a few times, you probably have as many different histories. With technology today, it should be no problem to keep all your medical history right in your pocket either on your phone, your computer, or in a file safely stored away. This history can include all tests, X-rays, and anything else that you have ever received from a physician. I think this is a real plus for us as we get older and can't remember everything anymore! Leveraging IPFS technology to store medical history could reduce repeat tests given due to missing records and provides a safe, encrypted way to share information directly with your doctor. One report in Discovery indicated that the use of AI is making headway for doctors to start eliminating valuable time spent in record keeping and, in doing so, giving time back to their patients. I see a lot of this potentially working well in Web3 because of decentralized, verifiable, and secure protocols that would benefit both the doctors and us. People can feel secure that their information can't be compromised. The future of Web3 I think this pandemic is only going to accelerate the use of Web3. Having the time at home and participating in this hackathon has piqued my own curiosity. I wonder what it would be like to build an app. I’m very interested in genealogy. What if I could store information about my family that would be accessible to my family? I could then move family trees from paid sites, such as Ancestry and MyHeritage. If I decided not to pay them anymore, my work is no longer accessible to me. I am also blind and struggle to read fine, small print. What about an app with visually-impaired functionality that could store my family’s genealogy securely for generations to come? I would like to store my family pictures and videos and maybe even an audio history. What I like about using Web3 technology with IPFS is that everything would be hashed and verifiable for future families. As I said right in the beginning, I am 73 years old. I have had a very busy life. By my genetic background, I can be around for another 15-20 years and want to be active, keep my brain active, and feel purpose. I would hope that some older and younger people might have some of the same feelings for themselves. It never hurts to learn new things... at any age! I have downloaded a VS Code program and some coding instructions to learn how to build. I have access to ThreadsDB, Buckets, Hub, and Powergate. Now, I'm off to go see my granddaughters and together we can try learning a little coding with the Raspberry Pi! Maybe I’ll see you at the next hackathon. In the meantime, I hope that you get inspired to learn about and hack on Web3, too. 73 and Web3 What is HackFS I am 73 years old with no previous Web3 experience and after spending four weeks participating at the ETHGlobal HackFS event, what I came away with is truly remarkable. The organizer gathers sponsors and experienced developers to teach about Web3 and share their knowledge and instruction about the knowledge, apps, and tools they have that will lead to the development of new apps for Web3. There are hundreds of participants organized into teams working together to build an app to present at the end of the hackathon for judging. This allows for an open exchange of ideas for both new and old developers. The positivity, flow of information, and excitement was evident even in a virtual setting. Everyone was encouraged to try new skills no matter their knowledge level. Without any previous understanding, I felt the urge to try it myself. There were times I thought I was in a cooking class. I started hearing some of the terminology like stacking and layers, but my biggest surprise was when I heard someone speaking about a Raspberry Pie. Raspberry Pie! The person spoke about adding information to his Raspberry Pi, and all I could do was picture an actual Raspberry Pie. I discovered that a Raspberry Pi is a small toy-looking device that can be programmed. My grandchildren have one of them and they're going to learn how to code with it. Now I know. At a later session, it turned out that there was an effort being made to build into this Raspberry Pi a way to communicate privately with another Raspberry Pi using one of the new protocols we had been learning about. This is partly what a hackathon is all about. Through these presentations, I began to learn some of the primary attributes of Web3. Learning Web3 During this project I was delving into the basics of Web3 at home. I found that in everyday life, we can see the influence the web has made, both good and bad. The development and subsequent use of Web3 offers a much safer, enjoyable option. The apps developed have one, and in some cases two, levels of encryption to safeguard important and personal data. In every case, you and only you own your information. In Web3, when you send an email, submit an order to a store, or even deposit money at your bank, you can do it without a server, and no middle-man. - That means less bandwidth. That is a good thing. - Requests are encrypted. That is a good thing. - Your orders or transactions can be recorded and verifiable. That is a good thing. There are many cases that benefit and could be safe, more secure, and verifiable using Web3. Web3 is building and building in a big way. There is a place for ideas to flourish. There are very few opportunities for new ideas on the current web because of the control of just a few entities. Web3 has no one controller. It is open for anyone to try. Success or failure is there for all to try. All equal. Exploring a use-case that affects us all One of the first areas affected by the pandemic is the doctors and the hospitals. We saw in the recent news that some doctors were taking to the web and visit with their patients online. I know some patients were reluctant and wondered if that was suitable. Not only physically, but there was concern about personal information. With laws today, privacy is a big issue. I see that as the perfect area for development of apps for doctors that would be both safe and effective. Based on what I learned this month, IPFS would be a suitable technology to build solutions for patients and doctors' needs. Do you have all your medical history? If you've moved a few times, you probably have as many different histories. With technology today, it should be no problem to keep all your medical history right in your pocket either on your phone, your computer, or in a file safely stored away. This history can include all tests, X-rays, and anything else that you have ever received from a physician. I think this is a real plus for us as we get older and can't remember everything anymore! Leveraging IPFS technology to store medical history could reduce repeat tests given due to missing records and provides a safe, encrypted way to share information directly with your doctor. One report in Discovery indicated that the use of AI is making headway for doctors to start eliminating valuable time spent in record keeping and, in doing so, giving time back to their patients. I see a lot of this potentially working well in Web3 because of decentralized, verifiable, and secure protocols that would benefit both the doctors and us. People can feel secure that their information can't be compromised. The future of Web3 I think this pandemic is only going to accelerate the use of Web3. Having the time at home and participating in this hackathon has piqued my own curiosity. I wonder what it would be like to build an app. I’m very interested in genealogy. What if I could store information about my family that would be accessible to my family? I could then move family trees from paid sites, such as Ancestry and MyHeritage. If I decided not to pay them anymore, my work is no longer accessible to me. I am also blind and struggle to read fine, small print. What about an app with visually-impaired functionality that could store my family’s genealogy securely for generations to come? I would like to store my family pictures and videos and maybe even an audio history. What I like about using Web3 technology with IPFS is that everything would be hashed and verifiable for future families. As I said right in the beginning, I am 73 years old. I have had a very busy life. By my genetic background, I can be around for another 15-20 years and want to be active, keep my brain active, and feel purpose. I would hope that some older and younger people might have some of the same feelings for themselves. It never hurts to learn new things... at any age! I have downloaded a VS Code program and some coding instructions to learn how to build. I have access to ThreadsDB, Buckets, Hub, and Powergate. Now, I'm off to go see my granddaughters and together we can try learning a little coding with the Raspberry Pi! Maybe I’ll see you at the next hackathon. In the meantime, I hope that you get inspired to learn about and hack on Web3, too. 73 and Web3 What is HackFS I am 73 years old with no previous Web3 experience and after spending four weeks participating at the ETHGlobal HackFS event, what I came away with is truly remarkable. The organizer gathers sponsors and experienced developers to teach about Web3 and share their knowledge and instruction about the knowledge, apps, and tools they have that will lead to the development of new apps for Web3. There are hundreds of participants organized into teams working together to build an app to present at the end of the hackathon for judging. This allows for an open exchange of ideas for both new and old developers. The positivity, flow of information, and excitement was evident even in a virtual setting. Everyone was encouraged to try new skills no matter their knowledge level. Without any previous understanding, I felt the urge to try it myself. There were times I thought I was in a cooking class. I started hearing some of the terminology like stacking and layers, but my biggest surprise was when I heard someone speaking about a Raspberry Pie. Raspberry Pie! The person spoke about adding information to his Raspberry Pi, and all I could do was picture an actual Raspberry Pie. I discovered that a Raspberry Pi is a small toy-looking device that can be programmed. My grandchildren have one of them and they're going to learn how to code with it. Now I know. At a later session, it turned out that there was an effort being made to build into this Raspberry Pi a way to communicate privately with another Raspberry Pi using one of the new protocols we had been learning about. This is partly what a hackathon is all about. Through these presentations, I began to learn some of the primary attributes of Web3. Learning Web3 During this project I was delving into the basics of Web3 at home. I found that in everyday life, we can see the influence the web has made, both good and bad. The development and subsequent use of Web3 offers a much safer, enjoyable option. The apps developed have one, and in some cases two, levels of encryption to safeguard important and personal data. In every case, you and only you own your information. In Web3, when you send an email, submit an order to a store, or even deposit money at your bank, you can do it without a server, and no middle-man. - That means less bandwidth. That is a good thing. - Requests are encrypted. That is a good thing. - Your orders or transactions can be recorded and verifiable. That is a good thing. There are many cases that benefit and could be safe, more secure, and verifiable using Web3. Web3 is building and building in a big way. There is a place for ideas to flourish. There are very few opportunities for new ideas on the current web because of the control of just a few entities. Web3 has no one controller. It is open for anyone to try. Success or failure is there for all to try. All equal. Exploring a use-case that affects us all One of the first areas affected by the pandemic is the doctors and the hospitals. We saw in the recent news that some doctors were taking to the web and visit with their patients online. I know some patients were reluctant and wondered if that was suitable. Not only physically, but there was concern about personal information. With laws today, privacy is a big issue. I see that as the perfect area for development of apps for doctors that would be both safe and effective. Based on what I learned this month, IPFS would be a suitable technology to build solutions for patients and doctors' needs. Do you have all your medical history? If you've moved a few times, you probably have as many different histories. With technology today, it should be no problem to keep all your medical history right in your pocket either on your phone, your computer, or in a file safely stored away. This history can include all tests, X-rays, and anything else that you have ever received from a physician. I think this is a real plus for us as we get older and can't remember everything anymore! Leveraging IPFS technology to store medical history could reduce repeat tests given due to missing records and provides a safe, encrypted way to share information directly with your doctor. One report in Discovery indicated that the use of AI is making headway for doctors to start eliminating valuable time spent in record keeping and, in doing so, giving time back to their patients. I see a lot of this potentially working well in Web3 because of decentralized, verifiable, and secure protocols that would benefit both the doctors and us. People can feel secure that their information can't be compromised. The future of Web3 I think this pandemic is only going to accelerate the use of Web3. Having the time at home and participating in this hackathon has piqued my own curiosity. I wonder what it would be like to build an app. I’m very interested in genealogy. What if I could store information about my family that would be accessible to my family? I could then move family trees from paid sites, such as Ancestry and MyHeritage. If I decided not to pay them anymore, my work is no longer accessible to me. I am also blind and struggle to read fine, small print. What about an app with visually-impaired functionality that could store my family’s genealogy securely for generations to come? I would like to store my family pictures and videos and maybe even an audio history. What I like about using Web3 technology with IPFS is that everything would be hashed and verifiable for future families. As I said right in the beginning, I am 73 years old. I have had a very busy life. By my genetic background, I can be around for another 15-20 years and want to be active, keep my brain active, and feel purpose. I would hope that some older and younger people might have some of the same feelings for themselves. It never hurts to learn new things... at any age! I have downloaded a VS Code program and some coding instructions to learn how to build. I have access to ThreadsDB, Buckets, Hub, and Powergate. Now, I'm off to go see my granddaughters and together we can try learning a little coding with the Raspberry Pi! Maybe I’ll see you at the next hackathon. In the meantime, I hope that you get inspired to learn about and hack on Web3, too.

Team

Martha L Roth
← click here to see all projects